(Re)Discover a culture beyond your imagination.
#tada ! #ig_Trinidad #instagrid #TrindadCarnival #kiddiescarnival #rosalindgabriel #Carnival2012 #photographersforum #bestofphotography #hbdKevonne ! #iloveu #smooches!

#tada ! #ig_Trinidad #instagrid #TrindadCarnival #kiddiescarnival #rosalindgabriel #Carnival2012 #photographersforum #bestofphotography #hbdKevonne ! #iloveu #smooches!

#mas #ig_Trinidad #carnival #kiddiescarnival #Trinidad

#mas #ig_Trinidad #carnival #kiddiescarnival #Trinidad

#pretty #mas #kiddiescarnival #Trinidad #Ig_Trinidad #instagrid #moretocome

#pretty #mas #kiddiescarnival #Trinidad #Ig_Trinidad #instagrid #moretocome

Mama Gastro.

Je pense que this is such a cool image n’est pas?

Mama Gastro.

Je pense que this is such a cool image n’est pas?

Image quotidien. #ecofriendly #clothesdryer #gogreen :-)

Image quotidien. #ecofriendly #clothesdryer #gogreen :-)

The smell of salt air. Been watching this structure fall. To see the water on your way to/from work :-) just pure luck. Thank you universe.

dynamicafrica:

Dynamic Africa Global Events Listing: Arts.

Calling all lovers of African and Afro-diasporan art! Here are some of the current and upcoming art exhibitions on our radar happening all over the world!

See more art events here.

Black Chronicles II at Rivington Place, London
12 September - 29 November, 2014

This exhibition looks at the presence of black people in Britain during the 19th and early 20th-century through the culture of studio portraiture.

Mame-Diarra Niang - “At the Wall” and Samson Kambalu - “Sepia Rain” at Stevenson, Johhanesburg
18 September - 31 October

Self-taught French-Ivorian-Senegalese photographer Mame-Diarra Niang explores space and movement in Dakar through a series of images taken while driving in a taxi through the city. Running concurrently, Malawian artist Samson Kambalu’s solo exhibition includes a series of short films, not more than a minute long, shot during his travels in Europe. The films, which Kambalu refers to as ‘Psychogeographical Nyau Cinema’, are inspired by the Gule Wamkulu (the Great Play) which has been celebrated by the Chewa in the masquerade culture of Malawi.

Rotimi Fani-Kayode at Tiwani Contemporary, London
19 September – 1 November, 2014

A solo retrospective on the artist’s work made during his lifetime, as one of the most highly influential figure in 1980s black British and African contemporary art.

John Akomfrah - “Imaginary Possessions” at Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, Michigan
19 September, 2014 - 1 February, 2015

Looking at the relationship between memory and identity, Ghanaian filmmaker, director, and theorist John Akomfrah creates moving-image works that address the histories of the African diaspora.

Kerry James Marshall - “Look See” at David Zwirner Gallery, London
11 October - 22 November, 2014

American artist Kerry James Marshall will be exhibiting new work at the David Zwirner gallery for a little over month, beginning in October. This also marks Marshall’s first solo show in London since his 2005 presentation at the Camden Arts Centre. During this exhibition, “Marshall will present new paintings that collectively examine notions of observing, witnessing, and exhibiting.”

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair at Somerset House, London
15 - 19 October, 2014

Over 100 different artists from all over the African continent will be exhibiting work at London’s Somerset House for the second edition of the annual 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair. The list of presenting artists includes Athi-Patra Ruga, Barthelemy Toguo, Peju Alatise, Malick Sidibé, Lakin Ogunbanwo, J.D. Okhai Ojeikere, Omar Victor Diop, Hassan Hajjaj, and of course, many, many more.

Afrovibes Festival 2014 in Amsterdam, Utrecht, Den Haag, Eindhoven and Rotterdam.
8 - 11 October, 2014 

This year, the festival’s theme is ‘New Heroes and Icons’. A range of artists across different disciplines will explore this theme through theatre, dance, design and music from South Africa, Mozambique and the Netherlands.

Ake Arts & Book Festival 2014, Abeokuta
18 - 22 November, 2014

Enjoy five days of book chats, panel discussions, interviews, school visits, music, film, performance art, dance, theatre, food, competitions, art exhibitions, book deals, book sales, parties and tours.

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To advertise and promote your event with Dynamic Africa, email dynamicafricablog@gmail.com.

dynamicafrica:

The Art of Hair as Adornment by Amira Ali.

In many African cultures, a woman’s hairstyle has often had varying social implications – mattering both socially and individually. Traditionally, in many African cultures, hair was usually dressed according to local culture complying with aesthetical standards. Beyond adornment and the aesthetics of identity, in cultural aspects hair has had a sacred element perceived as a substance with “supernatural power and spiritual import”.   

Often, cultural beauty, health and identity are intertwined - even in contemporary societies. In today’s highly globalized world deeply impacted by history, the politics of Black African hair, especially in western spaces, has many multi-layered social implications that can be both complex and deeply politicized. Outside of its traditional significance and the appreciation of beauty within whatever culture a specific hair style or type is standard, African women’s hair has and continues to be subject to shallow judgments and critique based on mainstream media’s Euro-centric standards of beauty that comes from the “ubiquity of whiteness”. Nevertheless, it seems that times are changing as a globally penetrating movement towards reclaiming one’s own authentic beauty continues to express itself through women in both Africa and the Diaspora. As adorning the head takes on the face of (re)claiming identity by purely wearing hair in its natural state of Afros and hair braided styles, the entire world is slowly having no option but to reframe their approach to the inherent beauty and diversity of black hair.

The tradition of braided hairstyles, predominantly in the Northern, Eastern, Central and Western African customs of hair grooming, date far back. “Depictions of women with cornrows have been found in Stone Age paintings in the Tassili Plateau of the Sahara that have been dated as far back as 3000 B.C.” History also reveals, “male styling with cornrows can be traced as far back as the early nineteenth century to Ethiopia, where warriors and kings such as Tewodros II and Yohannes IV were depicted wearing cornrows.”

Culturally, with its traditional significance, adorning the head implies more than merely a hairstyle of conevenience. Often pointing to the socio-economic status and characteristic of the wearer, as well as the link to the wearer’s culture, “the cultural significance and roots of braiding can be traced back to the African tribes. The braid patterns signify the tribe and help to identify the member of the tribe.“

Though many of us are unsure of the cultural significance and meanings of braided hairstyles today, and whilst many have been adapted to suit the styles and habits of women through time, customarily braid patterns or hairstyles illustrate “the significance of hair among various African cultures as an indicator of social status and religious function, a symbol of age and authority, a traditional aesthetic element or a statement of contemporary style, a substance with supernatural power and spiritual import, and an object of beauty and adornment”. In ancient Egypt, it is said that hair braiding was reserved for royalty and ceremonial rituals like weddings.

As braiding styles continue to gain popularity in the present, hair grooming, for the most part exposes modern age artistic designs that borrow from the past. In some African cities and parts of the Diaspora, though some of the cultural implications of hair such as braiding for ceremonial purposes such as weddings, and rites of passage rituals, patterns that signify ones ethnic group, and perhaps wealth and status, have been retained; for the most part, the traditional significance is less salient.

In the current trend, using synthetic or human hair, if possible, the wearer finds the most artistic braider or artisan of style that can sculpt a ‘do of the wearer’s choice. In general, sporting a braided style appears to be more of a fashion affirmation; while fashioning the body – physical appearance – is employed for self-expression and sole identity formation, with the exception of those who adorn themselves based on the conduct of a society, community or social group they belong to.  On the flip side, for some people of African descent residing in the Diaspora, braiding are considered as forms of “protesting standards of Eurocentric ideals of beauty, and both maintaining and retaining their links to Africa and African cultural traditions – claiming ancestral memory”.

No matter the meaning or purpose for how braids are worn, there is one universal that remains consistent in relation to hair braiding. The process of braiding offers a climate for the intimate exchanging of stories, and of bonding from one generation to the next, or between the worlds of the braider and client. It is symbolic to where women ritually share hushed or not so hushed stories in these spaces. In that way, hair has always had it’s own stories.

ari-abroad:

There are lots of stories in Sunday’s Weekend Edition that I’m excited about, but here’s a preview of one of my favorites, from a reporting trip I made to Scotland with @richpiccings in August. via Instagram http://ift.tt/1qcSHiU

ari-abroad:

There are lots of stories in Sunday’s Weekend Edition that I’m excited about, but here’s a preview of one of my favorites, from a reporting trip I made to Scotland with @richpiccings in August. via Instagram http://ift.tt/1qcSHiU